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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Maetzener, C. (2015). Diary of an Analysis with Freud: “Wie Benimmt Sich Der Prof. Freud Eigentlich?” Ein Neu Entdecktes Tagebuch Von 1921 Historisch Und Analytisch Kommentiert (“How Does Prof. Freud Actually Behave?” A Newly Discovered Diary From 1921 with Historical and Analytic Commentary), edited by Anna Koellreuter. Giessen: Psychosozial-Verlag, 2010, 319 pp., €32.90.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 63(2):337-350.

(2015). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 63(2):337-350

Book Essay

Diary of an Analysis with Freud: “Wie Benimmt Sich Der Prof. Freud Eigentlich?” Ein Neu Entdecktes Tagebuch Von 1921 Historisch Und Analytisch Kommentiert (“How Does Prof. Freud Actually Behave?” A Newly Discovered Diary From 1921 with Historical and Analytic Commentary), edited by Anna Koellreuter. Giessen: Psychosozial-Verlag, 2010, 319 pp., €32.90.

Review by:
Christian Maetzener

In the early spring of 1921, Anna G., a twenty-seven-year-old psychiatry resident at the Burghölzli, the Psychiatric University Clinic in Zurich where Eugen Bleuler was then director, contacted Freud through Emil Oberholzer and Oskar Pfister. She wanted to know if he would take her as a patient. She had been engaged for seven years to a man she knew from medical school, and her wedding was planned in detail for the following September. But she remained ambivalent about the relationship. Hoping to gain clarity about whether she should go through with the marriage, she decided to consult Freud. He answered her with a letter dated March 23, 1921:

Dear Doctor, given my currently cramped patient schedule I am happy to hear that you are one and the same patient who was recommended to me by Oberholzer and Pfister. I am answering right away so that we can come to a quick decision. I cannot agree to see you before I know whether you accept my fee and whether I can accept your timing, something you have not mentioned yet. I am charging 40 Swiss francs an hour, payable monthly, and do not take anyone who cannot stay until July 15th. The last point alone is decisive.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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