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Stobart, K. (2000). Jungian Thought in the Modern World edited by Elphis Christopher and Hester McFarland Solomon. Published by Free Association Books, London, New York, 2000; 277 pages; £16.95.. Brit. J. Psychother., 17(2):256-258.
   

(2000). British Journal of Psychotherapy, 17(2):256-258

Jungian Thought in the Modern World edited by Elphis Christopher and Hester McFarland Solomon. Published by Free Association Books, London, New York, 2000; 277 pages; £16.95.

Review by:
Karen Stobart

The contributors to Jungian Thought in the Modern World set themselves the task of describing the development of Jungian thought as applied to the ‘big subjects’. These are the nature and workings of the psyche; the structure and dynamics of the conscious and unconscious; how the personality develops and expresses itself; the emergence of meaning; the significance of culture, religion, and spirituality; the mind/body split; the problem of evil and the existence of God. The authors lead the reader through varying disciplines, which include physics, sociology, ecology and religion as well as analytical psychology, in a lively and profound way. The content of each diverse chapter is related both to Jung the man and Jung the thinker. In contrast to many other writers in the field of psychoanalytic psychotherapy they are generous in acknowledging the contribution made other pioneers in this field, for example, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein.

The book is divided into four parts but the foreword and introduction should be read rather than skimmed since they explain the main Jungian concepts: for example, synchronicity, self, collective unconscious, etc. They also highlight the importance of Jung's contribution to understanding that both observer and observed are involved in any interaction and his recognition of the inseparability of mind and matter.

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