Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the glossary of psychoanalytic concepts…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Prior to searching for a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review PEP Consolidated Psychoanalytic Glossary edited by Levinson. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Grundy, D. (2001). Hysteria: Where has it Gone? A Review of Mad Men and Medusas: Reclaiming Hysteria by Juliet Mitchell. New York: Basic Books, 2000. xii + 381 pp.Hysteria by Christopher Bollas. New York: Routledge, 2000. 192 pp.Hysteria from Freud to Lacan: The Splendid Child of Psychoanalysis by Juan-David Nasio, Translated by Susan Fairfield. New York: Other Press, 1998. xxii + 151 pp.Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria edited by Muriel Dimen and Adrienne Harris. New York: Other Press, 2001. xvii + 358 pp.. Contemp. Psychoanal., 37(2):335-353.
    

(2001). Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 37(2):335-353

Hysteria: Where has it Gone? A Review of Mad Men and Medusas: Reclaiming Hysteria by Juliet Mitchell. New York: Basic Books, 2000. xii + 381 pp.Hysteria by Christopher Bollas. New York: Routledge, 2000. 192 pp.Hysteria from Freud to Lacan: The Splendid Child of Psychoanalysis by Juan-David Nasio, Translated by Susan Fairfield. New York: Other Press, 1998. xxii + 151 pp.Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria edited by Muriel Dimen and Adrienne Harris. New York: Other Press, 2001. xvii + 358 pp.

Review by:
Dominick Grundy, Ph.D.

Language serves as a substitute for action; by its help, an affect can be ‘abreacted’

—Breuer and Freud, 1893

Most of the essays in Studies on Hysteria by Breuer and Freud were published in 1895. Thus, 1995 was its unofficial centennial and a chance for psychoanalysts to wonder, not for the first time, “whatever happened to hysteria?” The quotation above is from the “Preliminary Communication” (p. 8), the 1893 essay that was the opening chapter of their joint publication. They are brave words, but also costly ones. They became the basis for a stereotype of analytic technique that turned out to be problematic; new qualifications had to be made, which the lay public did not always know about. In the last essay of the book, dated two years later, Freud was already beginning to introduce such concepts as defence, therapeutic alliance, and transference. Nevertheless, there are still patients who start analysis hoping that their problems will be over once they verbally recapture con brio something they once had, but then lost. It would probably have helped if they had been told that these brave words were written about cases of hysterical amnesia. Treatment of hysteria once represented what little psychoanalysis there was. Hysteria was taken on board first, it might be said, but was gradually lost in the ship's hold. Lacan, as we shall see, seems to have carried forward the trend of generalizing hysteria into much of psychoanalysis, but others tried to bury hysteria like a dead grandfather, honored but irrelevant.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.