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Tip: To review the bibliography…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Buechler, S. (2008). Uses and Abuses of Power in Training: Reviews of Power Games: Influence, Persuasion, and Indoctrination in Psychotherapy Training, edited by Richard Raubolt. New York: Other Press, 2006, 320 pp. andProblems of Power in Psychoanalytic Institutions (Psychoanal. Inq., Vol. 24 No. 1), edited by Howard Levine and Gail S. Reed. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press, 2004, 144 pp.. Contemp. Psychoanal., 44(1):167-173.

(2008). Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 44(1):167-173

Uses and Abuses of Power in Training: Reviews of Power Games: Influence, Persuasion, and Indoctrination in Psychotherapy Training, edited by Richard Raubolt. New York: Other Press, 2006, 320 pp. andProblems of Power in Psychoanalytic Institutions (Psychoanal. Inq., Vol. 24 No. 1), edited by Howard Levine and Gail S. Reed. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press, 2004, 144 pp.

Review by:
Sandra Buechler, Ph.D.

There is hope for the reduction of problems within psychoanalytic organizations. Secrecy, insularity, and the isolation of power are decreasing. Consistent with 21st -century science, we understand that the management of organizations is part of a process. Psychoanalytic organizations are in a better position to be more compatible with the humanitarian characteristics of psychoanalysis.

—Melvin Bornstein

I have no doubt that psychoanalytic training often tends to foster in candidates a turn from their original idealism to a kind of quiet Fanaticism. I have always been appalled at the religious nature of much of the discourse in the field. The authority to control all aspects of the lives, indeed the souls, of others can all too easily create monsters of senior analysts, teachers, and supervisors.

—Richard Raubolt

POLITICALLY SPEAKING, I came of age in the antiestablishment, antiVietnam War era. Professionally, I grew up on a diet of Erich Fromm, R. D. Laing, and Thomas Szasz, among others. It is not hard for me to mistrust those in power. But as I move through my own career, I ask more frequently if the abuse of power in analytic institutes is inevitable. Another form of the question, closer to my own way of thinking, is if it is possible to retain integrity, or wholeness, as a training analyst.

Elsewhere

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