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Tip: To sort articles by year…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Year. This will rearrange the results of your search chronologically, displaying the earliest published articles first. This feature is useful to trace the development of a specific psychoanalytic concept through time.

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Bernstein, J.W. (2019). The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology: The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology in Psychoanalysis and Culture By Danielle Knafo and Rocco Lo Bosco Routledge Press, 2017 302pp., $53.95. DIVISION/Rev., 19:12-15.

(2019). DIVISION/Review, 19:12-15

The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology: The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology in Psychoanalysis and Culture By Danielle Knafo and Rocco Lo Bosco Routledge Press, 2017 302pp., $53.95

Review by:
Jeanne Wolff Bernstein

There could not have been a timelier book written right now than Danielle Knafo and Rocco Lo Bosco's book, The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology in Psychoanalysis and Culture. Ever since Danielle Knafo spoke about the very same subject in Vienna last year, her sharp analysis of how technology has pervaded the most intimate human relationships and has replaced the human body with highly stylized silicone dolls or robotic devices has never left my mind. Nearly every week, I would find articles in various newspapers alerting and alarming their readers how robots were taking over our lives, be it in intimate affairs, the war, or even now in agriculture as a means of replacing migrant workers, who are no longer allowed into the USA because of Trump's immigration policies. Wherever there is a lack, loss, or danger, a life-like doll or an almost human look -a-like robot can serve as a substitute and take over the task deemed to be too threatening, both physically and emotionally, to the human body.

One powerful argument threading its way through Knafo and Lo Bosco's book is that “as we are becoming to some extent dehumanized, our objects, especially our electronic devices, are becoming increasingly humanized” (xv).

Before Knafo leads the reader into her own consulting room with her patient Jack, who suffers from intimacy problems, having been married and divorced twice, she offers a remarkable summary of various psychoanalytic theories about perversion. That first chapter alone could serve as a much-needed text to teach perversion at our institutes.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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