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Tip: To sort articles by year…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Year. This will rearrange the results of your search chronologically, displaying the earliest published articles first. This feature is useful to trace the development of a specific psychoanalytic concept through time.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hansell, J. (2000). Who's that Girl? Who's that Boy: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory: Lynne Layton. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1998, 267 pp.. Gender and Psychoanalysis, 5(2):185-195.

(2000). Gender and Psychoanalysis, 5(2):185-195

Book Review

Who's that Girl? Who's that Boy: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory: Lynne Layton. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1998, 267 pp.

Review by:
James Hansell, Ph.D.

Lynne Layton's recent book Who's That Girl? Who's That Boys? Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory could not be timelier. As anyone interested in postmodernism in general and gender theory in particular knows, the last decade has been a dizzying journey in which no conceptual touchstone has gone unturned. Feminist and postmodern critiques have raucously exposed the sexist biases in traditional psychoanalytic accounts of gender and sexuality. Queer theorists have shaken our confidence in the very categories we use to think about such matters—categories such as female and male, feminine and masculine, heterosexual and homosexual. For psychoanalytic clinicians, the postmodern critique of things long assumed to be good (e.g., stable core gender identity) and the postmodern celebration of things assumed to be bad (e.g., a fragmented sense of self has made for some serious head scratching. Layton's book brings new light and much needed perspective to these contemporary conundrums. With a stunning mastery of complex and diverse areas of Theory, Layton manages and impressive integration of the two theoretical pillars of her book: postmodernism and relational psychoanalytic theory.

Layton

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