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J., E. (1922). General: Stanley Hall. The Freudian Methods applied to Anger. American Journal of Psychology, July 1915, p. 438.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:342-342.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: General: Stanley Hall. The Freudian Methods applied to Anger. American Journal of Psychology, July 1915, p. 438.

(1922). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 3:342-342

General: Stanley Hall. The Freudian Methods applied to Anger. American Journal of Psychology, July 1915, p. 438.

E. J.

This paper was read in May at a meeting of the American Psychopathological Association. The point of it is that the Freudian mechanisms also apply to other matters than those of sex, e. g. anger. Hall says he has vainly tried to interest normal psychologists in psycho-analysis, and he seems to sympathise with the reason they give, viz. that 'these patients and their doctors alike are sex-intoxicated, and that the Freudian psychology applies only to perverts and erotomaniacs or other abnormal cases. To ascribe all this aversion on their part to social and ethical repression is shallow, for the real causes are both manifold and deeper. They are part of a complicated protest of normality, found in all and even in the resistances of subjects of analysis, which is really a factor basal for self-control, of the varying good sides of which Freudians tell us nothing. The fact is that there are other things in the human psyche than sex and its ramifications. Hunger, despite Jung, fear, despite Sadger, and anger, despite Freud, are just as primary, aboriginal and independent as sex, and we fly in the face of fact and psychic experience to derive them all from sex'.

The analogies he sees in the case of anger are as follows: (1) Anger is the most dynamogenic of all the emotions. Further, 'few if any impulsions of man, certainly not sex, have suffered more intense, prolonged or manifold repression'. (2) Anger has many forms of Verschiebung. (3) It has countless forms of sublimation. (4) It has its dreams and reveries. 'So weird and dramatic are these scenes often that to some minds we must call anger and hate the chief springs of the imagination'.

In the middle of the paper is an apparently irrelevant passage in which it is stated that 'the Ichtrieb is basal, and the fondest and most comprehensive of all motives is that to excel others, not merely to survive, but to win a larger place in the sun'. Perhaps to be correlated with this is the introductory sentence in which Hall protests against Freud's 'most impolitic and almost vituperative condemnation' of Adler.

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Article Citation

J., E. (1922). General. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:342-342

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