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J., E. (1922). Dreams: E. R. Thompson. An Inquiry into some Questions connected with Imagery in Dreams. British Journal of Psychology, October 1914, p. 300.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:351-352.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Dreams: E. R. Thompson. An Inquiry into some Questions connected with Imagery in Dreams. British Journal of Psychology, October 1914, p. 300.

(1922). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 3:351-352

Dreams: E. R. Thompson. An Inquiry into some Questions connected with Imagery in Dreams. British Journal of Psychology, October 1914, p. 300.

E. J.

This is a study of some specific dream problems suggested by Freud's Traumdeutung. 190 dreams of five subjects were available. The problems were as follows: (1) Does compensation of imagery occur in dreams, or is the imagery characteristic of the individual's waking life the most prominent in his dreams? No evidence for compensation was found. Thompson further makes the statement that there is a correlation between waking and dream imagery in a given person; this is contradictory to the results obtained by other workers, Calkins, Hacker, Weed, etc., who find that visual imagery is the most prominent in dreams in all cases. (2) Is there a relation between the type of imagery and the rate at which a dream becomes forgotten? Thompson finds that the type of imagery most characteristic of waking life has

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the strongest perseverative tendency when it occurs in dreams. (There is a flaw in the argument here, for the author in this experiment employed only subjects of the visual type, without therefore controls. Reviewer.) (3) The central motif in a dream was found to be presented in the form of imagery most characteristic of both waking and dream life. Psycho-analysis is said to have been employed to determine which was the central motif. (4) Sensory stimuli during sleep never cause the dream, but may be woven into its structure in exactly the way described by Freud, being distorted for the purpose of the dream tendency. (5) Condensations occur more frequently in visual than in auditory imagery, and in the latter case more frequently with words than with sounds. (6) Critical thought and reasoning occur in dreams sometimes, and then shew all the clearness and logical consistency of waking thought. Thompson gives nine examples of this, but judges exclusively from the manifest content, so that his conclusion is of no interest.

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Article Citation

J., E. (1922). Dreams. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:351-352

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