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The list of books available on PEP Web is sorted alphabetically, with the exception of Freud’s Collected Works, Glossaries, and Dictionaries. You can find this list in the Books Section.

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J., E. (1922). Applied Psycho-Analysis: K. J. Karlson. Psychoanalysis and Mythology. Journal of Religious Psychology, Nov. 1914, Vol. VII, pp. 137-213.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:365.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Applied Psycho-Analysis: K. J. Karlson. Psychoanalysis and Mythology. Journal of Religious Psychology, Nov. 1914, Vol. VII, pp. 137-213.

(1922). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 3:365

Applied Psycho-Analysis: K. J. Karlson. Psychoanalysis and Mythology. Journal of Religious Psychology, Nov. 1914, Vol. VII, pp. 137-213.

E. J.

The title of this paper is rather a misnomer, for the subject of the paper is not so much the relation of psycho-analysis to mythology as the general psychology of myth-formation, and the mention of psychoanalysis occupies less than a fifth of the whole paper. A long general account of mythology, its phenomena and the explanations that have been offered of them, is given, myths being divided into 'nature myths' and 'hero myths'. Then an elementary and not over successful account of Freud's psychological theory follows, this being presented in a sympathetic manner. The author's conclusions are very general in nature, but one gathers that he holds the human explanation of mythology, i. e. that myths do not arise so much from interest in external phenomena as from the projections of internal emotions, of which, as the author admits, the sexual is by far the most important. The article is a very readable account of modern views of mythology, without being in any way startling.

It is perhaps worth while calling attention to a curious mistake in nomenclature committed by the author. He says that the word 'Vorbewute' is to be translated in English by 'foreconscious', and 'Unbewute' by 'either unconscious or preconscious'. It must be remarked, however, on the contrary, that in English 'foreconscious' and 'preconscious' have exactly the same meaning, of course 'Vorbewute', though the second is to be preferred as not being a hybrid.

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Article Citation

J., E. (1922). Applied Psycho-Analysis. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 3:365

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