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Scott, W.M. (1962). Symposium: A Reclassification of Psychopathological States. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 43:344-346.

(1962). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 43:344-346

Symposium: A Reclassification of Psychopathological States

W. Clifford M. Scott

The present model of metapsychological abnormality which we have progressively developed has taken the place of earlier simpler models of symptom formation as reaction to trauma. Our newer models should allow both (a) more adequate classification of the normal and abnormal aspects of a personality at any age, and (b) more adequate classification of our patients, for discussion with colleagues in other sciences.

We observe more constitutional facts than we often discuss. Our classification and description of these facts should enhance our relationship to geneticists. Inherited aspects will be subject to modification by most if not all of the mental mechanisms described to date, but this should not prevent us from observing the limits of variability.

Our observations of zonal discharge, of primary and derivative libido and mortido, and our observations of zonal defusion or lack of defusion should be classified and described in terms which should enhance our relationship to ethologists, anatomists, and physiologists.

We observe the ego as that developing apparatus through which the id makes contact with the world, and this forces us to observe maturation and development at all stages. We observe the multiple functions of the ego, both in terms of the development of affect, in terms of the sequence of cognitive differentiations, and in terms of all the mental mechanisms described to date. These facts should be classified and described in terms which will enhance our relationship to psychologists.

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