Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return to the issue’s Table of Contents from an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can go back to to the issue’s Table of Contents in one click by clicking on the article title in the article view.  What’s more, it will take you to the specific place in the TOC where the article appears.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Stoller, R.J. (1964). A Contribution to the Study of Gender Identity. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 45:220-226.

(1964). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 45:220-226

A Contribution to the Study of Gender Identity

Robert J. Stoller

Gender identity is the sense of knowing to which sex one belongs, that is, the awareness 'I am a male' or 'I am a female'. This term gender identity' will be used in this paper rather than various other terms which have been employed in this regard, such as the term 'sexual identity'. 'Sexual identity' is ambiguous, since it may refer to one's sexual activities or fantasies, etc. The advantage of the phrase 'gender identity' lies in the fact that it clearly refers to one's self-image as regards belonging to a specific sex. Thus, of a patient who says: 'I am not a very masculine man', it is possible to say that his gender identity is male although he recognizes his lack of so-called masculinity. The term 'gender identity' was arrived at in joint discussions of a research project on this and allied problems by Greenson and Stoller during which many of the formulations in this paper were worked out.

Gender identity seems to be produced in normal human beings by the following elements: first, the anatomy and physiology of the external genital organs, by which is meant the appearance of and the sensations from the external, visible, and palpable genitalia; second, the attitudinal influences of parents, siblings, and peers. Whether these consider a child a boy or a girl will ordinarily play an extremely important part in establishing and confirming the gender identity. To these two determinants, those usually stressed when identity is discussed in terms of maleness or femaleness,

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.