Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Buie, D.H., Jr. (1977). Discussion of the Paper by E. R. Shapiro, R. L. Shapiro, J. Zinner and D. A. Berkowitz on 'The Borderline Ego and the Working Alliance: Indications for Family and Individual Treatment in Adolescence'. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 58:89-93.

(1977). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 58:89-93

Discussion of the Paper by E. R. Shapiro, R. L. Shapiro, J. Zinner and D. A. Berkowitz on 'The Borderline Ego and the Working Alliance: Indications for Family and Individual Treatment in Adolescence'

Dan H. Buie, Jr.

This paper by E. R. Shapiro et al. (this issue) reports another segment of the authors' excellent clinical studies of disturbed adolescents and their families. I discern only one difficulty, and that is their use of the concept of splitting. A brief recapitulation of their thesis will prepare the way for clarifying my reservations.

The thesis of the paper is that the borderline adolescent is compelled by a variety of forces (striving for autonomy is one) towards separation from his family. This separation intensifies life and death dependency needs, and it exacerbates tension over similar dependency issues in the parents. The resulting distress is more than any of the troubled family can tolerate; they revert as a group to pervasive use of certain defences which are developed at an earlier stage in their life cycles. The authors identify these defences as splitting, projective identification and, by implication, introjection. The family employs these defences in such a way as to fixate the adolescent's pathological state; his reaction to the parents' use of projective identification is especially pernicious.

The borderline adolescent is very often intensely negativistic in impulses, feelings, and ideation towards his parents, the therapist and himself. Non-specific ego weakness and his ready resort to projective identification frequently make it difficult for him to perceive his therapist as really helpful. The working alliance is especially vulnerable to being capsized by hostilities emanating from family interactions.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.