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Tip: To sort articles by sourceā€¦

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Source. This will rearrange the results of your search, displaying articles according to their appearance in journals and books. This feature is useful for tracing psychoanalytic concepts in a specific psychoanalytic tradition.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Pulver, S.E. (1984). Psychoanalytic Supervision: A Method of Clinical Teaching: By Joan Fleming and Therese F. Benedek. In Classics in Psychoanalysis, Monograph No. 1. New York: International Universities Press. 1983. Pp. 252. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 65:489-492.

(1984). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 65:489-492

Psychoanalytic Supervision: A Method of Clinical Teaching: By Joan Fleming and Therese F. Benedek. In Classics in Psychoanalysis, Monograph No. 1. New York: International Universities Press. 1983. Pp. 252

Review by:
Sydney E. Pulver

When this book was first published in 1966, it was widely hailed as an outstanding contribution to psychoanalytic pedagogy. The years have proven that this enthusiastic reception was more than merited, and the work is now fittingly republished as Monograph I in Classics in Psychoanalysis, a categorization which it truly deserves.

Being a good psychoanalytic supervisor is not the same thing as being a good clinician, although the latter is, of course, a prerequisite. Doing good supervision is a complex business, a fact that we have long recognized in our literature but tend to overlook in actual practice. In most psychoanalytic institutes the positions of training and supervising analysts, while separate in name, are treated for all practical purposes as if they were identical. Appointment to the position is made on the basis of the institute's estimate of clinical rather than supervisory abilities (political considerations aside). There is usually no special training for doing supervision, the expectation being that the new supervisor will learn by on-the-job training, reading, and experience. As the authors clearly document, this attitude is wrong-headed. They contend, and I think they demonstrate that supervisory work requires as much and perhaps more sensitivity than is necessary for clinical work, since the supervisor must be attuned not only to the relationship between the patient and the analyst and the progress of the analytic process between them, but also to the relationship that he himself has with the analyst.

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