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Tip: To review The Language of Psycho-Analysis…

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Prior to searching a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review The Language of Psycho-Analysis written by Laplanche & Pontalis. You can access it directly by clicking here.

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Barnett, B. (1998). The Dream Discourse Today. Edited by Sara Flanders. London and New York: Routledge. 1993. Pp. 237.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 79:623-626.

(1998). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 79:623-626

The Dream Discourse Today. Edited by Sara Flanders. London and New York: Routledge. 1993. Pp. 237.

Review by:
Bernard Barnett

If we judge by the steady number of both non-specialist and psychoanalytic publications on dreams that have appeared in the literature, it is clear that the topic continues to fascinate both the lay public and the practising psychoanalyst. In the latter case, even though the dream is now regarded as only one of a number of ‘royal roads’ to the unconscious, the analyst will almost certainly ‘sit up and take notice’ when a patient says, ‘I had this dream …!’ As readers of this journal will be aware, the inclusion of a dream in the descriptive material of case reports also remains a favourite method of clinical illustration.

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