Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see who cited a particular article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To see what papers cited a particular article, click on “[Who Cited This?] which can be found at the end of every article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Civitarese, G. (2014). Prendersi Cura. Sul Senso Dell'Esperienza Psicoanalitica [Taking Care: On the Meaning of Psychoanalytic Experience] by Adamo Vergine and Pia De Silvestris FrancoAngeli, Milan, 2012; 208 pp; € 27.00. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 95(6):1348-1355.

(2014). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 95(6):1348-1355

Prendersi Cura. Sul Senso Dell'Esperienza Psicoanalitica [Taking Care: On the Meaning of Psychoanalytic Experience] by Adamo Vergine and Pia De Silvestris FrancoAngeli, Milan, 2012; 208 pp; € 27.00

Review by:
Giuseppe Civitarese

Not the Accademia bridge, nor Calatrava's Constitution Bridge, but the many small bridges which pass over the canals of Venice: this is the picture which came into my mind as I read the successive chapters of the book by Vergine and De Silvestris. These chapters are brief passages which help us to overcome the obstacles of misunderstanding, dogmatism and problematic cruxes which clutter psychoanalytic theory: but, as in the Venetian lagoon, also to pause on their welcoming summits for breathtaking glimpses which are always the same and yet unbelievably new and surprising. That is the nature of psychoanalysis. We never stop engaging with it, fascinated by its perennial questions, but always with renewed passion. In the end it is ineffable and mysterious, and could not be otherwise, because then it would not be able to reflect the complexity of its subject: the human mind.

Just as the making of a mind needs another mind, so to grasp this complexity and take account of the mystery of subjectivity it is necessary for analysts to use their own subjectivity. The authors of the book are well aware of this. Creativity and style are indispensable resources even when working from a scientific perspective. It is the same when working with the patient. The theories of psychoanalysis cannot dispense with style. The analyst's style expresses his individuality and capacity not only to observe, but to feel - or rather, with Bion, to ‘suffer’ - the events of the analysis. Using the body of his words he passes on an understanding of things which is not only intellectual, but profound, emotional and unconscious.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.