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Meyers, M.B. (2017). Panel Report, IPA Congress Buenos Aires 2017: Violation of Intimacy and Gender. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 98(6):1804-1807.

(2017). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 98(6):1804-1807

Panel Report, IPA Congress Buenos Aires 2017: Violation of Intimacy and Gender

Marilyn B. Meyers

Chair: Gertraud Schlesinger-Kipp (Germany)

Presenters: Joshua Durbin (Israel) and Ester Palerm (Spain)

Discussant: Alexandra Billinghurst (Sweden)

Reporter: Marilyn B. Meyers

This panel was presented by the Committee on Women and Psychoanalysis (COWAP).

The two papers presented at this panel were focused on issues of failures in containment in the early developmental years. The cases elucidated the conflict surrounding issues of longing for merger and terror of separation. These conflicts were evident in the transference/countertransference enactments. Both papers demonstrated the analyst's capacity to withstand and contain the anxieties and projections that they faced with the patient. Thus, the analyst's capacity to contain intense affect was challenged but metabolized.

Dr Durban, in his paper ‘Intimate Violence, Violent Intimacy’, spoke about his work with a male patient in analysis who “suffered from a confusion between intimacy and violence”. This confusion was based on an intense archaic wish for and anxiety regarding fusion with the mother. The mother was experienced by the patient (Simon) as an “impenetrable, unreal object”. Simon was described as a successful surgeon who sought analysis for difficulties in forming long-lasting relationships with women, sleep disturbances and anxiety attacks. Dr Durban described his initial countertransference feelings of a closeness and tenderness that were unsettling. The patient was charming, but also capable of ruthlessness in intimate relationships.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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