Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To zoom in or out on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Are you having difficulty reading an article due its font size? In order to make the content on PEP-Web larger (zoom in), press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the plus sign (+). Press Ctrl (on Windows) or ⌘Command (on the Mac) and the minus sign (-) to make the content smaller (zoom out). To go back to 100% size (normal size), press Ctrl (⌘Command on the Mac) + 0 (the number 0).

Another way on Windows: Hold the Ctrl key and scroll the mouse wheel up or down to zoom in and out (respectively) of the webpage. Laptop users may use two fingers and separate them or bring them together while pressing the mouse track pad.

Safari users: You can also improve the readability of you browser when using Safari, with the Reader Mode: Go to PEP-Web. Right-click the URL box and select Settings for This Website, or go to Safari > Settings for This Website. A large pop-up will appear underneath the URL box. Look for the header that reads, “When visiting this website.” If you want Reader mode to always work on this site, check the box for “Use Reader when available.”

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Roth, N. (1974). The Freud/Jung Letters. The Correspondence between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung. William McGuire, Ed., Translated by Ralph Manheim and R. F. C. Hull, Bollingen Series XCIV., Princeton University Press, 1974, 650 pp., $17.50. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 2(4):393-394.

(1974). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 2(4):393-394

The Freud/Jung Letters. The Correspondence between Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung. William McGuire, Ed., Translated by Ralph Manheim and R. F. C. Hull, Bollingen Series XCIV., Princeton University Press, 1974, 650 pp., $17.50

Review by:
Nathan Roth

As the years have passed since the death in 1939 of Sigmund Freud, and the biographies, autobiographies and correspondence of various notable personages in the psychoanalytic movement have made their appearance, an ever deepening understanding of this field of scientific thought has been made possible. Surely the Freud/Jung correspondence is one of the most significant and informative of these contributions. Of all the pieces of psychoanalytic history, few seem to this reviewer more interesting and gripping, more surprising, or more productive of new insights into the course of psychoanalytic events.

In these six years of active and close collaboration and friendship between two dedicated and resourceful men, carefully chronicled in a prolific correspondence, we find a wealth of information not hitherto accessible. At the outset there is the youthful Jung drawn to the mature Freud, apparently primarily to get help in the understanding of dreams. There was no other truly adequate source for this information. Freud is seen as attracted to the promising, zealous and engaging young man and indubitably forming a strong bond of affection for him. Indeed, he came to designate Jung as his “adopted son”, “crown prince” and the future leader of the psychoanalytic “cause.” Freud was not only impressed by the younger man's ability; he had other reasons for pursuing this attachment. Antisemitic Vienna had given him much reason to believe that a Christian leader would bring a readier consideration of his work.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.