Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Barahal, H.S. (1982). Intrapsychic and Interpersonal Dimensions of Treatment, A Clinical Dialogue: Robert Langs, M. D., and Harold F. Searles, M. D., Jason Aronson, New York and London, 1980, 323 pp., $25.00.. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 10(2):321-323.

(1982). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 10(2):321-323

Intrapsychic and Interpersonal Dimensions of Treatment, A Clinical Dialogue: Robert Langs, M. D., and Harold F. Searles, M. D., Jason Aronson, New York and London, 1980, 323 pp., $25.00.

Review by:
Hyman S. Barahal, M.D.

I am thankful for the opportunity of reading and reviewing this book. It is an unusual publication but not quite what would be anticipated by the title. It is not a treatise on intrapsychic and interpersonal concepts, although there may be minimal references to techniques and theorizing in those areas. It would be the impression of this reviewer that the title chosen was an afterthought. As a matter of fact, it is believed that the actual decision to write the book came as an afterthought and was not originally planned as such.

It had been the practice of Searles to make complete tape recordings of analytic sessions with patients he subsequently employed the same procedure in his dialogues with Langs. A good portion of the book deals with the taping of a complete session with a schizophrenic patient he had been seeing privately in his Washington, D. C. office for a period of about 18 years for several sessions a week. This patient, with the pseudonym Joan Douglas, was still residing at Chestnut Lodge (Little Lodge) but was permitted to make the trip unattended to Searles office. Treatment had started while Searles was still on the staff of Chestnut Lodge. Interestingly enough, after 25 years of analytic treatment, Joan Douglas, although allegedly improved, still actively hallucinated, was delusional, with her thinking dissociated and highly concretized. This reviewer found her reactions and her occasional verbal productions difficult to comprehend but, apparently, Searles, after so many years of contact with this patient, seemed to possess an uncanny grasp and understanding of her symbolic expressions, her hostility, resistance, transference and countertransference.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.