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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Roth, N. (1988). Freud's Self-Analysis: Didier Anzieu (translated from the French by Peter Graham/with a preface by M. Masud R. Khan), International Universities Press, Madison, CT, 1986, xix + 618 pp., $60.00.. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 16(4):562.

(1988). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 16(4):562

Freud's Self-Analysis: Didier Anzieu (translated from the French by Peter Graham/with a preface by M. Masud R. Khan), International Universities Press, Madison, CT, 1986, xix + 618 pp., $60.00.

Review by:
Nathan Roth, M.D.

This remarkable volume will probably be the last of its kind for a long time. It is a monumental and detailed study, not only of Freud's self-analysis, but of his method of thinking, his relationships with others, and the evolution of psychoanalysis. Every analyst will find something of value for himself in it. For example, many writers have described Freud's dislike of music, but Anzieu says this is not true, and he lists many musical compositions that Freud enjoyed (p. 102). The authority for this highly unusual statement is not given. All analysts have known of Freud's trepidation concerning train journeys, but how many of us have known of his fear of crossing the street? Indeed, we must wonder how he completed his headlong dashes around Vienna and other towns if he feared to cross streets. Again the authority for this datum is not given, and we long to learn of it.

However, the main trends described in this volume are more important. Freud's self-analysis is said to have started with his mourning for his father who died in October, 1896, although the systematic work began in the spring of 1897 and ended in 1901. The study of the self-analysis is closely correlated with the writing of The Interpretation of Dreams and is observed in a month-by-month investigation of Freud's dreams, his relationship with Fliess and the gradual unfolding of his discoveries. Thus, we find such interesting conclusions that the dream of Goethe's attack on Herr M marks the elimination of Freud's transference on to Fliess (p.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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