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Tip: To review the glossary of psychoanalytic concepts…

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Prior to searching for a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review PEP Consolidated Psychoanalytic Glossary edited by Levinson. You can access it directly by clicking here.

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Glucksman, M.L. Kramer, M. (2004). Using Dreams to Assess Clinical Change During Treatment?. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 32(2):345-358.

(2004). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 32(2):345-358

Using Dreams to Assess Clinical Change During Treatment?

Myron L. Glucksman, M.D. and Milton Kramer, M.D.

This article describes several studies that examine the relationship between the manifest content of selected dreams reported by patients and their clinical progress during psychoanalytic and psychodynamically oriented treatment. There are a number of elements that dreaming and psychotherapy have in common: affect regulation; conflict resolution; problem-solving; self-awareness; mastery and adaptation. Four different studies examined the relationship between the manifest content of selected dreams and clinical progress during treatment. In each study, the ratings of manifest content and clinical progress by independent observers were rank-ordered and compared. In three of the four studies there was a significant correlation between the rankings of manifest content and the rankings of clinical progress. This finding suggests that the manifest content of dreams can be used as an independent variable to assess clinical progress during psychoanalytic and psychodynamically oriented treatment.

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