Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the bibliography…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Shulman, G. (2002). Closely Observed Texts: Learning from Reading: Henry James's Novel What Maisie Knew. J. Child Psychother., 28(2):217-233.

(2002). Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 28(2):217-233

Closely Observed Texts: Learning from Reading: Henry James's Novel What Maisie Knew

Graham Shulman

This paper discusses a central theme of the novel What Maisie Knew by Henry James, namely the development of a child's consciousness and internal world in a hostile psychological environment. It explores the way in which the novel dramatizes the problems for a child, in such circumstances, of knowing and understanding her own experience and the adult world. The paper charts the difficulties for Maisie in negotiating a child's ordinary tasks and stages of psychic growth, and in particular the Oedipal situation. It also explores the parallel in the novel between the child's attempts to know and the attempts of the reader of fiction to know, and the use of reading as a metaphor for perception and learning.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.