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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Shulman, G. (2019). Time past, time present, time future: reflections on the development of the sense of duration as a foundation for a durable object, going on being and sense of self. J. Child Psychother., 45(3):323-339.

(2019). Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 45(3):323-339

Time past, time present, time future: reflections on the development of the sense of duration as a foundation for a durable object, going on being and sense of self

Graham Shulman

This theoretical paper takes as its starting point a question posed by Alvarez: ‘how does a sense of a durable object get built up?’. The paper considers one dimension of the earliest processes of post-natal primitive psychic life and organisation, relevant to Alvarez’s question: the formation and development, at a micro level, of an internal sense of duration of object and self, leading to a sense of continuation and continuity; and how over time this in turn forms a foundation for the experience of ‘going on being’ and sense of self. Sander’s concept of ‘organized states of consciousness’ in earliest post-natal life is drawn on to elucidate the prerequisite for the development of a sense of duration. The role and significance of ‘biorhythmicity’ and rhythm in infancy are discussed, in relation to the development of a sense of duration. The development of a sense of duration is in turn linked to the development of a sense of time. Observational material from an Emotional State Assessment of a Looked After infant in foster care, and clinical material from the four times weekly individual psychotherapy of a Looked After two-year-old, are used to illustrate the development of a sense of duration.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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