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Sidoli, M. (1988). Samuels, A. (London). ‘Oltre il principio femminile: un punto di vista post-junghiano’ (Beyond the feminine principle: a post-Jungian point of view). L'Immaginale, No. 8, April 1987.. J. Anal. Psychol., 33(3):307-308.

(1988). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 33(3):307-308

Samuels, A. (London). ‘Oltre il principio femminile: un punto di vista post-junghiano’ (Beyond the feminine principle: a post-Jungian point of view). L'Immaginale, No. 8, April 1987.

Review by:
Mara Sidoli

After expressing his debt to Freud for his choice of title, Andrew Samuels goes on to indicate the principal points he will discuss in his paper: 1) the implication for analytical psychology of the modern interest in femininity; 2) research on femininity and the so-called ‘feminine principle’; and 3) his thoughts on the father-daughter relationship.

In the first part of the paper he defines what he considers to be the main points of post-Jungian development in recent years: mainly a rejection of the cult of ‘perfection’, and a democratisation of the concepts of the archetypes and of individuation. In other words, there has been a shift towards a position resembling that of psychoanalysis. This is based on the interaction of a variety of psychic themes, behaviour, images, emotions, instincts, clinically applied within the transference-countertransference relationship and its detailed analysis.

He then goes on to examine whether the contemporary interest in what one may call ‘the feminine principle’ agrees with his own definition of the post-Jungian position. He mentions various women writers in the USA during the 1970s and 1980s who described themselves as post-Jungians in an attempt to question ideas of Jung which appeared to them unsatisfactory or plainly wrong, without, however, rejecting Jung altogether. In his late writings Jung had stated that there was something eternal about woman, and that women exhibit certain characteristics which cannot be rooted in history or the culture into which they are born and must, therefore, be exclusively psychological.

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