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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Wilkinson, M. (2002). PALLY, R., in collaboration with David Olds/Foreword by Mark Solms. The Mind-Brain Relationship. International Journal of Psychoanalysis Key Papers Series. London & New York: Karnac Books, 2000. Pp. vi + 196. Pbk. £15. 95.. J. Anal. Psychol., 47(1):120-121.

(2002). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 47(1):120-121

PALLY, R., in collaboration with David Olds/Foreword by Mark Solms. The Mind-Brain Relationship. International Journal of Psychoanalysis Key Papers Series. London & New York: Karnac Books, 2000. Pp. vi + 196. Pbk. £15. 95.

Review by:
Margaret Wilkinson

This book brings together in a scholarly, yet accessible form, insights from the world of the neurosciences. It is Dr Pally's application of these insights to day-to-day technique in the consulting room that I have found so valuable, especially in work with traumatized and borderline patients. Mark Solms points out that this book enables ‘the non-specialist reader to grasp - almost in a single sitting - the main thrust of contemporary brain research on a range of topics of vital interest to psychoanalysis’ (p. iv).

The first chapter makes clear the experience-dependent nature of the development of the brain. The three subsequent chapters cover perception, memory and emotion. The last two chapters deal with particular aspects of the bilaterality of the brain, and consciousness. The book presents data drawn from animal and human research to chart new understandings about the mind-brain relationship and draws out the implications for the consulting room of each major area of research. The book is referenced in a way that gives pointers to the reader for further exploration.

Dr Pally emphasizes the importance of both nature and nurture; while half the human genome is devoted to brain development, much development has been shown to continue after birth and to be dependent on a satisfying and stimulating relation to the care-taker, especially in the period, proposed by Schore, of six months to one year after birth. It is exciting to see Fordham's theory of the importance of deintegrative and reintegrative experiences for the infant underpinned by the later insights of neuro-science.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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