Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see author affiliation information in an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To see author affiliation and contact information (as available) in an article, simply click on the Information icon next to the author’s name in every journal article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hewison, D. (2002). HAUKE, CHRISTOPHER & ALISTER, IAN (eds.). Jung and Film: Post-Jungian Takes on the Moving Image. London: Brunner-Routledge, 2001. Pp. xvi + 254. Pbk. £16.99.. J. Anal. Psychol., 47(2):311-313.

(2002). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 47(2):311-313

HAUKE, CHRISTOPHER & ALISTER, IAN (eds.). Jung and Film: Post-Jungian Takes on the Moving Image. London: Brunner-Routledge, 2001. Pp. xvi + 254. Pbk. £16.99.

Review by:
David Hewison

Edited by:
Barbara D. Stephens and Susanna Wright

In this edited collection of papers and essays about film Hauke and Alister have assembled a kind of map of contemporary Jungian takes on the moving image. The contributors are a mix of academics and clinicians each bringing a different sensibility to the understanding of film. Similarly, there is a wide range of subject matter that includes individual films, genres, directors and themes. As such the book does not speak with one voice - and this is, no doubt, the intention behind the ‘post-Jungian’ subtitle as Hauke and Alister's previously edited book Contemporary Jungian Analysis: Post-Jungian Perspectives from the Society of Analytical Psychology (Routledge 1998), and Hauke's recent Jung and the Postmodern: The Interpretation of Realities (Routledge 2000) would suggest. A plurality of voices is felt to be the most appropriate way to depict the contemporary Jungian endeavour; this means that the book suffers from a lack of a sustained argument with which a reader can engage, but at the same time stimulates a range of different reactions, and every reader will have their own favourite chapters. The editors have attempted to deal with the rich mix of papers and with the fact that their intended audiences are themselves mixed - Jungian and other depth psychological clinicians on the one hand and media and film studies students and practitioners on the other - by a clear introduction to the task of the book, and the individual papers, and by the inclusion of a glossary of the main Jungian terms.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.