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Dourley, J. (2002). Response to Barbara Stephens's ‘The Martin Buber-Carl Jung disputations: protecting the sacred in the battle for the boundaries of analytical psychology’ Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2001, 46, 3, 455-91). J. Anal. Psychol., 47(3):479-492.

(2002). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 47(3):479-492

Response to Barbara Stephens's ‘The Martin Buber-Carl Jung disputations: protecting the sacred in the battle for the boundaries of analytical psychology’ Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2001, 46, 3, 455-91) Related Papers

John Dourley, Ph.D.

The importance of the issues

Barbara Stephens is to be commended for keeping alive the issues involved in the Jung-Buber dispute because these issues go so deeply into Jungian psychology and are so encompassing of cognate fields such as religious studies and theology. From a Jungian perspective the issues engage both Jungian therapy and theory in a number of crucial areas. The dispute clarified Jung's understanding of the intrapsychic origin of all religious experience and through such experience the creation of the Gods and Goddesses, including all variants of monotheistic divinity, through the process of projection granting them an autonomous and ontological existence beyond the psyche which, in fact, creates them. In doing this the dispute illuminated how Jung understood the relation of transcendence to immanence and how he confined both to the intrapsychic sphere, making of transcendence a function of an immanent power ever transcending its conscious expression while denying the possibility that anything could enter the psyche not native to it. Effectively this is to say that nothing knowable lies beyond the boundaries of the psyche, greatly extended as they are by Jung. The dispute further identified Jung's location of the origins of the Gods and Goddesses in the impact of archetypal energies on consciousness in the form of numinous experience. This location enabled him once more to make clear that such experience is the psyche's ultimate therapeutic resource as well as one of its greatest dangers when such experience escapes containment and pits communities possessed by such experience in the form of their presiding deity against each other.

The

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