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Tip: To review an author’s works published in PEP-Web…

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The Author Section is a useful way to review an author’s works published in PEP-Web. It is ordered alphabetically by the Author’s surname. After clicking the matching letter, search for the author’s full name.

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Roazen, P. (2002). CABOT REID, JANE (ed. & narrator). Jung, My Mother, and I: The Analytic Diaries of Catharine Rush Cabot. Einsiedeln: Daimon Verlag, 2001. Pp. 640. Hbk. £26. 00; $37. 95.. J. Anal. Psychol., 47(4):643-645.

(2002). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 47(4):643-645

CABOT REID, JANE (ed. & narrator). Jung, My Mother, and I: The Analytic Diaries of Catharine Rush Cabot. Einsiedeln: Daimon Verlag, 2001. Pp. 640. Hbk. £26. 00; $37. 95.

Review by:
Paul Roazen, M.A.

Jung studies have taken rather longer to blossom than one might have expected, but we seem now to be in a period of increasingly serious scholarly inquiries. At a time when the dominant ideology in psychotherapy, at least in North America, seems increasingly devoted to devising new forms of technologies, especially of a psycho-pharmacological nature, it is welcome to be reminded of all the characteristics that various earlier schools of thought shared in an era marked by a more humanistic concern with the fate of the human spirit.

The beauty of Jung, My Mother and I is that it contains a first-hand account in the form of diaries written by someone who was in treatment with Jung over a period of almost thirty years, marked by many interruptions. Catharine Rush Cabot had married the eldest son of Boston's famed Godfrey Lowell Cabot, but she preferred living in Europe (where she had spent most of her youth) to the States; widowed at an early age, Catharine managed on a relatively small inheritance to afford to continue a continental existence without undertaking any profession or career.

Catharine was in analysis with Jung and also with Toni Wolff, Emma Jung, as well as C. A. Meier. (Catharine took lessons with Marie-Louise von Franz and became a member of the Psychological Club in Zürich.) It seems that Catharine kept notes during most of her clinical sessions, and subsequently wrote them out. Although she was by no means a great writer, the accounts of what her analysts said to her sound authentic to me.

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