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Want to know the exact German word that Freud used to refer to a psychoanalytic concept? Move your mouse over a paragraph while reading The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud and a window will emerge displaying the text in its original German version.

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Hufford, D. (2008). Knoblauch, Steven. ‘Body rhythms and the unconscious: toward an expanding of clinical attention’, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2005, 15, 6, pp. 807-27. J. Anal. Psychol., 53(4):595-598.

(2008). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 53(4):595-598

Knoblauch, Steven. ‘Body rhythms and the unconscious: toward an expanding of clinical attention’, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2005, 15, 6, pp. 807-27

Review by:
David Hufford

Edited by:
Ladson Hinton and Marica Rytovaara

This article by Steven Knoblauch intrigued me as much for the ways it reverberates within the intersubjective layers of the analytic world, as for the clinical ideas it offers concerning the intersubjective space of analysis. It was presented at a 2004 Conference entitled ‘The Interplay of Implicit and Explicit Processes in Psychoanalysis’, suggesting that awareness of the existence and importance of non-verbal, unconscious communication has become an emerging focus of attention in psychoanalysis, at least in relational psychoanalysis.

The heart of the paper is a description of how the author attends to the intersubjective dialogue within the analytic hour in a way that expands analytic attention beyond ‘the symbolizing process of free association’ (p. 815), to the non-verbal communication that takes place between analyst and analysand, both consciously and unconsciously. This non-verbal communication is referred to as ‘subsymbolic’, and includes both affective and embodied communication: e.g.,

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