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Tip: To sort articles by source…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Source. This will rearrange the results of your search, displaying articles according to their appearance in journals and books. This feature is useful for tracing psychoanalytic concepts in a specific psychoanalytic tradition.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Rutte, J.W. (2011). Slavin, Jonathan H. ‘Becoming an individual: technically subversive thoughts on the role of the analyst's influence’. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2010, 20, 3, pp. 308-24.. J. Anal. Psychol., 56(4):561-563.

(2011). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56(4):561-563

Journal Reviews

Slavin, Jonathan H. ‘Becoming an individual: technically subversive thoughts on the role of the analyst's influence’. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 2010, 20, 3, pp. 308-24.

Review by:
Joseph W. Rutte

Jonathan Slavin, a psychoanalyst and clinical instructor in psychology, Harvard Medical School, has written a provocative paper that questions the primacy of the ‘analytic self’ (as opposed to the ‘personal self’) as being the primary catalyst in helping the patient to experience real change and growth. In support of this view, he cites Anna Freud (1954, p. 618):

With due respect for the necessary strictest handling and interpretation of the transference, I still feel that somewhere we should leave room for the realization that the analyst and patient are also two real people, of equal adult status, in a real personal relationship to each other. I wonder whether our - at times complete - neglect of this side of the matter is not responsible for some of the hostile reactions which we get from our patients and which we are apt to ascribe only to ‘true transference’. But these are technically subversive thoughts and ought to be ‘handled with care’.

Slavin suggests that several Freudian recommendations are clinically questionable. For example, the idea of neutrality, that is, a mental position from which the analyst would work to reduce or eliminate analytic influence on the patient's mind, he sees as unrealistic. Further, he states that the ‘transference cure’ is really not a cure but rather a substitution for the voice of the original parental authority with the voice of the analyst's authority in the patient's mind.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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