Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see who cited a particular article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To see what papers cited a particular article, click on “[Who Cited This?] which can be found at the end of every article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Segal, N. (2002). Feminism and Its Discontents: A Century of Struggle with Psychoanalysis by Mari Jo Buhle (Cambridge, MA, and London: Harvard University Press, 1998, 432 pp); reviewed by Naomi Segal. Psychoanal. Hist., 4(2):247-253.

(2002). Psychoanalysis and History, 4(2):247-253

Feminism and Its Discontents: A Century of Struggle with Psychoanalysis by Mari Jo Buhle (Cambridge, MA, and London: Harvard University Press, 1998, 432 pp); reviewed by Naomi Segal

Review by:
Naomi Segal

About 17 years ago, I gave a paper called ‘Psychoanalysis and feminism and psychoanalysis’. It was the era when books were appearing all the time with such titles ccentury’ (16). It feels somewhat strange to see this fundamental relationship reintroduced as the object of a history. But that is perhaps the way with generations and wheels, and 17 years may be a long time in cultural studies.

The ‘initiating impulse’ of Mari Jo Buhle's Feminism and Its Discontents (1998) was to develop ‘the problems and issues within feminist scholarship’ (20), more specifically to restore ‘feminist “theory” to the realm of “thought” […] at the nexus between feminism and psychoanalysis’ (21). Following a premise that the two bodies of thought ‘developed dialogically’, she explains their modernity thus:

Feminism and psychoanalysis together share a large responsibility for […] the distinctly modern spectacle of ‘consciousness of self. Distantly grounded in the humanistic legacy of the Renaissance, psychoanalysis and feminism both concern the meaning of individuality in a secular society and, as philosophical systems, gained coherence only as [the twentieth] century began. Psychoanalysis took shape as a clinical or therapeutic method, feminism as a political strategy. The two systems occupied a common domain as theories of human liberation, even at subsequent moments of conflict or competition.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.