Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To search only within a publication time period…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Looking for articles in a specific time period? You can refine your search by using the Year feature in the Search Section. This tool could be useful for studying the impact of historical events on psychoanalytic theories.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Abraham, K. (1935). Amenhotep IV (Ikhnaton)—A Psychoanalytic Contribution to the Understanding of his Personality and the Monotheistic Cult of Aton. Psychoanal Q., 4:537-569.

(1935). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 4:537-569

Amenhotep IV (Ikhnaton)—A Psychoanalytic Contribution to the Understanding of his Personality and the Monotheistic Cult of Aton

Karl Abraham

In the year 1880, near the Egyptian village of Tell el-Amarna, various tablets with Asiatic texts were found which, when deciphered, proved to be important historical documents disclosing certain facts of Egyptian history—particularly those concerning King Amenhotep IV and his reign—hitherto unknown. On the basis of these "Amarna-tablets" and some hieroglyphic texts of that period previously known, we are able to draw a rather full picture of the personality of the king. Various reference books and histories of Ancient Egypt containing an abundance of valuable information on the period in question have furnished the basic data for the considerations which follow. The works of Breasted and Weigall's excellent monograph on the life of Amenhotep IV deserve particular mention in this connection.

The marked interest, even enthusiasm, Egyptologists have shown in the "Heretic King" who gave himself the name Ikhnaton—a title we will later explain—might appear strange, even incomprehensible, to the uninitiated.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.