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Feigenbaum, D. (1936). Montagu David Eder, M.D—(1866-1936). Psychoanal Q., 5:444-446.

(1936). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 5:444-446

Montagu David Eder, M.D—(1866-1936)

Dorian Feigenbaum

The loss sustained by the psychoanalytic movement with the passing of Montagu David Eder of London on March 30, 1936, is incalculable. He was one of those rare personalities who give themselves with equal devotion to a variety of interests and causes, both scientific and social, without diminishing the value of their services to any one of them. In particular, one must be struck by the number and the variety of the projects which Dr. Eder initiated or organized; it was one of the major motifs of his life to throw himself with enthusiasm into the making of fresh beginnings.

A politically minded thinker, Dr. Eder was active as a Socialist and played an important part in the Fabian Society. A leading Zionist, Dr. Eder was a member of the Jewish Territorial Organization and during the war was instrumental in organizing the Jewish Battalion. Interrrupting his psychoanalytic practice for five years, he held high political office in Palestine until 1923, subsequently presided over the English Zionist Federation and the London Committee of the Hebrew University, and acted as a governor of the University.

A less creative and energetic man might have found such extensive participation in the political and social movements of his day a profession in itself. Dr. Eder was equally distinguished as a physician and psychoanalyst. The social and medical interests of Montagu David Eder were only different aspects of the same eager and penetrating concern with all things human.

Dr. Eder graduated in science in 1891, and completed his medical preparation four years later at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. After traveling extensively in the United States, Bolivia and South Africa, where he became attached to the British army as surgeon and saw war service, Dr.

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