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G., R. (1943). War Medicine: A Symposium: Edited by Winfield Scott Pugh, M.D., Commander (M.C.) U.S.N., Retired. Edward Podolsky, M.D., Associate Editor. Dagobert D. Runes, Ph.D., Technical Editor. New York: Philosophical Library, 1942. 565 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 12:423-424.
    

(1943). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 12:423-424

War Medicine: A Symposium: Edited by Winfield Scott Pugh, M.D., Commander (M.C.) U.S.N., Retired. Edward Podolsky, M.D., Associate Editor. Dagobert D. Runes, Ph.D., Technical Editor. New York: Philosophical Library, 1942. 565 pp.

Review by:
R. G.

In fifty-seven chapters, many written by one or more United States or British medical officers who have had direct experience in the present war, the First World War, or both, a variety of topics ranging from gunshot wounds of the heart to physiology and high altitude flying and 'athlete's foot' are covered. With few exceptions the chapters are written to give direct, practical, and concise information, although each reader may find that, as is usual with such topical compilations, the treatment of his specialty is incomplete and uneven in the value of the contributions to it. It is divided into three sections—Surgery, Aviation and Naval Medicine, and General Medicine. Unfortunately, there is no index.

Three chapters at the end of the book are allotted to psychiatry. On the subject, Malingering, Lieutenant Colonel Hulett gives many valuable guides to the detection of malingering but seems never to have asked himself why a particular man is a malingerer. It may be necessary in the exigencies of war to treat malingering as a criminal offense, but it is more moralistic than psychiatric to write of the malingerer: 'It is indeed devastating to recognize, as we must, that all men are not possessed of manhood, and that the "yellow streak" down the backs of some of our fellows is invisible to the unaided human eye'. Major William H. Dunn contributes an excellent psychiatric review and summary of the problem presented by The Psychopath in the Armed Forces. In Selective Service Psychiatry, Dexter M.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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