Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the bibliography…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Heiman, M. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: Analysis of a Cartoon in a Case of Hypochondriasis. Lois Munro. Pp. 53–57.. Psychoanal Q., 19:278-279.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: Analysis of a Cartoon in a Case of Hypochondriasis. Lois Munro. Pp. 53–57.

(1950). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 19:278-279

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: Analysis of a Cartoon in a Case of Hypochondriasis. Lois Munro. Pp. 53–57.

Marcel Heiman

Munro's paper is based on a cartoon which her patient handed her three weeks after he started analysis. In the cartoon a bottle contains an Arab and a Jew, face to face, both crowded like a baby in utero, their teeth bared, knife and pistol drawn. The stopper of this bottle with the two hostile genii is a British soldier labeled 'British Mandate', showing unmistakable signs of the pressure underneath. The patient had hypochondriacal complaints from early childhood: colic and stabbing pains in his abdomen, gas perpetually escaping through mouth and anus, and a feeling of chokinglike constriction around his neck. Afraid of any social contacts because of the danger of exploding, the patient saw himself as the British soldier in the cartoon who had to maintain order 'in the Palestine of his inside'. An explosion of the warring forces inside would hurt him and his environment as well.

A childhood memory which the patient brought up in his second interview and the material connected with it, gathered over a period of seven months, are the basis for the conclusions reached in Munro's paper. The Jew in the cartoon was his mother, the Arab his father. His uncontrollable greed had caused him, in fantasy, to devour his mother (or her breast) and his father (or his penis). This had made both inadequate, unable to satisfy each other or to be satisfied by each other. Thus having unconsciously deprived them both, he assuaged his guilt by projecting the idea of deprivation onto them. Since his inside was the battleground on which both parents fought each other as well as him, he had to suffer the pain for his deed. The fantasy that a man is a castrated woman is seen in the fact that both parents are pictured as men in the cartoon.

It seems of particular importance that Munro states that this patient had what she calls 'addiction to analysis', i.e., periods of psychotherapy of several months' duration from different therapists. Munro states that this was an acting out of the idea that the therapist is breastless, impotent, and unable to help him. By picturing the therapist without breasts he denies the act of

- 278 -

having taken possession of the breast but at the same time makes it impossible for himself to be helped.

- 279 -

Article Citation

Heiman, M. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948. Psychoanal. Q., 19:278-279

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.