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The Author Section is a useful way to review an author’s works published in PEP-Web. It is ordered alphabetically by the Author’s surname. After clicking the matching letter, search for the author’s full name.

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Orr, D.W. (1950). Psychoanalysis and the Social Sciences, Volume II: Edited by Géza Róheim, Ph.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1950. 329 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 19:583-586.

(1950). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 19:583-586

Psychoanalysis and the Social Sciences, Volume II: Edited by Géza Róheim, Ph.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1950. 329 pp.

Review by:
Douglass W. Orr

Nine authors are represented in this second anthology devoted to psychoanalysis and the social sciences. A comprehensive introduction is supplied by de Saussure's article, Psychoanalysis and History. This is followed by anthropological papers by Bonaparte, Devereux, Muensterberger and Róheim. Aesthetics and history are represented by Lee and Lowenfeld, respectively, while the two final papers, written by Kurth and Money-Kyrle, are on sociological subjects.

De Saussure points out that the method of psychoanalysis is itself historical, and then summarizes Freud's contributions to historical objectivity, to social psychology and to anthropology. The unique contribution of psychoanalysis to history is implied in the question: 'What are the fundamental emotional attitudes of a time and how did they reflect on the social structure and the cultural patterns?' All history is written from one or more points of view; that of psychoanalysis is the interpretation of unconscious causation behind a civilization and its political events.

Methodological difficulties arise from our lack of a system by which to connect and classify individual reactions and social patterns. The basic unit in such a system, says de Saussure, is affect which has three components: 1, an emotion; 2, a representation of the outside world; and 3, a potential action. The socialization of affects is accomplished in a variety of ways that, successful or unsuccessful, have implications for the fate both of individuals and of groups.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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