Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Reider, N. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: An Unfinished Paper on Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. Ella M. Sharpe. Pp. 98–109.. Psychoanal Q., 19:606-607.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: An Unfinished Paper on Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. Ella M. Sharpe. Pp. 98–109.

(1950). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 19:606-607

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: An Unfinished Paper on Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. Ella M. Sharpe. Pp. 98–109.

Norman Reider

Marjorie Brierley, who edited this work, explains in an introductory note one thesis of Ella Sharpe's Shakesperian studies: that the plays represent a cyclic movement with rhythmic phases of alternating tragedy and comedy. Left incomplete by Sharpe at her death, this study of Hamlet is faithfully edited and makes some significant contributions to the theory of creative art, sublimation, and manic-depression.

Sharpe first shows that Hamlet reveals an organic, emotional, and mental unity. The dramatic structure of the play has a basic fidelity to body functions which is accompanied by fidelity to emotional experiences. The mental content expressed in the thoughts of the different characters is consistent with the experiences of the poet. The organic and functional basis of Hamlet is revealed in Hamlet's procrastination. The infantile situation of the poet-to-be is congruent with the later use of this device in building tension in the drama. Details of Shakespeare's life which fit with this thesis are given. The content of many lines is analyzed to show the relation between body function and the metaphor implied in 'procrastination'. Jones's essay, The Madonna's Conception Through the Ear, finds confirmation in the Hamlet theme.

Masterfully interwoven are new researches on the complex structure of the Ghost, the role of the Christos motif, Hamlet's masculine counterpart in Fortinbras and feminine counterpart in Ophelia, and known details of Hamlet's life and times. A paragraph pointing out that the graveyard scene and the allusions to 'poor Yorick' refer to memories of Shakespeare's father is particularly cogent.

- 606 -

Sharpe's ideas about creative art and sublimation merit special study. For example, she writes: 'My impression is that the surge of thwarted genital impulse and desire at the Oedipal climax re-animates pregenital drives and imparts to them something of the creativity which is the specific attribute of genitality'. However, no abstract or quotation can do justice to the wealth of ideas in this paper which must be read in its entirety.

- 607 -

Article Citation

Reider, N. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948. Psychoanal. Q., 19:606-607

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.