Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see the German word that Freud used to refer to a concept…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Want to know the exact German word that Freud used to refer to a psychoanalytic concept? Move your mouse over a paragraph while reading The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud and a window will emerge displaying the text in its original German version.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Schur, M. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: A Note on Freud's Scientific Imagination. Leo Angelo Spiegel. Pp. 124–125.. Psychoanal Q., 19:609.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: A Note on Freud's Scientific Imagination. Leo Angelo Spiegel. Pp. 124–125.

(1950). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 19:609

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948: A Note on Freud's Scientific Imagination. Leo Angelo Spiegel. Pp. 124–125.

Max Schur

Freud's hypothesis on the basic form and functioning of the psychic apparatus, stemming from his theory of the structure of the dream as published in 1900, is very similar to the theory based on modern central nervous system physiology proposed by the British neurophysiologist, Adrian, in the first Ernest Jones lecture forty-six years later. Spiegel sees in that 'ability to generate the necessary mental voltage to throw an illuminating spark across poles of knowledge that are apparently unrelated' a proof of Freud's 'scientific imagination'. No one will question that this is an excellent example of the tremendous 'mental voltage' necessary for such an achievement, but we must remember that Freud was also a neurophysiologist. His deep interest in physiology and the structure of the central nervous system started his scientific career and continued from the Aphasia through to the Outline and the Mystic Writing Pad. The recently published Fliess letters show his constant, intensive endeavor to correlate his metapsychology with the physiology of the central nervous system. So, in a way, the spark was thrown from Freud, the founder of a new psychology, to Freud, the neurophysiologist.

- 609 -

Article Citation [Who Cited This?]

Schur, M. (1950). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXIX, 1948. Psychoanal. Q., 19:609

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.