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Fessler, L. (1951). ber Psychische Energetik Und Das Wesen Der Träume (On the Conception of Psychic Energy and the Nature of Dreams): By C. G. Jung. Second, enlarged and improved edition of Über die Energetik der Seele (On the Concept of Psychic Energy). Zürich: Rascher Verlag, 1948. 311 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 20:463-464.

(1951). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 20:463-464

ber Psychische Energetik Und Das Wesen Der Träume (On the Conception of Psychic Energy and the Nature of Dreams): By C. G. Jung. Second, enlarged and improved edition of Über die Energetik der Seele (On the Concept of Psychic Energy). Zürich: Rascher Verlag, 1948. 311 pp.

Review by:
Laci Fessler

This book contains six articles, the titles of which are: 1, On the Concept of Psychic Energy; 2, General Aspects on the Theory of the Complex; 3, General Aspects on the Psychology of the Dream; 4, On the Nature of the Dream; 5, Instinct and the Unconscious; 6, The Psychological Foundation of the Belief in Spirits. Articles 1, 2, and 4 were previously published in English.

In General Aspects on the Psychology of the Dream, Jung's principal statements are first, that dreams have a continuity toward the future as well as to the past; second, the importance of an interpretation which clarifies 'the immanent goal-directed tendencies' in a dream is stressed. This point of view is called finalistic (finale Betrachtungsweise) and must be distinguished from the teleological approach. According to Jung the freudian school generally does not accept more than one meaning to a symbol, whereas his finalistic interpretation is more flexible and permits several meanings. Moreover, a symbol does not necessarily disguise an unconscious wish, but works like a 'parable; not disguising but educating or enlightening'. Jung describes Freud's theory of dream functioning as protecting sleep as too narrow, referring to dreams that disturb sleep as having 'a compensatory content'.

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