Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To print an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To print an article, click on the small Printer Icon located at the top right corner of the page, or by pressing Ctrl + P. Remember, PEP-Web content is copyright.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Rubinfine, D.L. (1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Transference Phenomena and Transference Analysis in an Acute Catatonic Schizophrenic Patient. H. Rosenfeld. Pp. 457-464.. Psychoanal Q., 23:146.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Transference Phenomena and Transference Analysis in an Acute Catatonic Schizophrenic Patient. H. Rosenfeld. Pp. 457-464.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:146

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Transference Phenomena and Transference Analysis in an Acute Catatonic Schizophrenic Patient. H. Rosenfeld. Pp. 457-464.

David L. Rubinfine

The author observes that most analysts avoid treating schizophrenic patients because of the belief that such patients, having regressed to an objectless, autoerotic state, are incapable of forming a transference. He summarizes those reports in the literature dealing with transference phenomena in schizophrenics. Alluding to the great stimulus that Melanie Klein's research has given to the treatment of psychotic patients, Rosenfeld devotes the remainder of his paper to an elaboration of the Kleinian formulation of the role of the 'paranoid schizoid position', 'projective identification', and ego splitting in the schizophrenias. 'The schizophrenic … seems to become confused with [his] object … due not only to identification by introjection, but to impulses and fantasies of entering inside the object with the whole or parts of himself in order to control it.' These impulses 'may be regarded as the most primitive type of object relationship, starting from birth… The schizophrenic has never … outgrown this … and in the acute … state he regresses to this early level.'

The author mentions in passing the defenses of the ego against these impulses and cites negativism as an example. He then presents in some detail clinical material from a twenty-year-old schizophrenic whom he 'treated by psychoanalysis' for four months. 'One may say that the analytic procedure in this case was in all essentials the same as in neurotic cases.' How this is compatible with a subsequent statement, 'I had at times to understand and interpret quickly with very little material', is left to our conjecture.

The case material presented does strikingly illustrate schizophrenic 'ego splitting', the confusion of subject and object, and the sweep of introjection and projection in the transference, and is well worth reading.

The author concludes that he has endeavored 'to illustrate that the withdrawn state of the schizophrenic patient cannot be considered simply as an autoerotic regression'. He also suggests that the concept of projective identification is opening new fields of research and has made it possible 'to understand and interpret the transference phenomena of this patient'.

- 146 -

Article Citation

Rubinfine, D.L. (1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952. Psychoanal. Q., 23:146

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.