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Gray, M. (1954). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. I, 1953: Past and Present in the Transference. Mark Kanzer. Pp. 144-154.. Psychoanal Q., 23:295-296.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. I, 1953: Past and Present in the Transference. Mark Kanzer. Pp. 144-154.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:295-296

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. I, 1953: Past and Present in the Transference. Mark Kanzer. Pp. 144-154.

Milton Gray

Psychoanalysis is designed to reveal the subtleties and ramifications of the psychic processes that link past and present. This paper discusses the difficulties in reconstruction of the past, and stresses the importance of following and comprehending the significance of the patient's current behavior. Clinical examples are cited.

The importance of the transference and its investigation is emphasized. Transference phenomena may be regarded as somewhat resembling the manifest content of the dream: one portion, leading to the day's residues, illuminates the contemporary

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components of the transference, while another portion, derived from the past, delineates the genetic development. The analyst can study the relationship of the ego and id at three levels of functioning, close to the id as in dreams, close to the ego as in everyday adjustment, and at a point intermediate between the two in the phenomena of the transference. During free association the analyst follows images moving progressively from the past and also regressively from the present and coalescing about himself. By his interpretation, the analyst brings these processes into consciousness at an appropriate moment. The therapeutic processes, however, involve not only the emergence of repressed images into consciousness but also the working through of conflicts to create a personality that will not succumb to traumas.

The adaptation of analytic principles to problems in education, child guidance, and brief therapy are noted and the difference of their aims and achievements from that of full analysis is pointed out.

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Article Citation

Gray, M. (1954). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. I, 1953. Psychoanal. Q., 23:295-296

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