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Grotjahn, M. (1954). The Nature of Prejudice: By Gordon W. Allport. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., Inc., 1954. 537 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 23:605-605.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:605-605

The Nature of Prejudice: By Gordon W. Allport. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., Inc., 1954. 537 pp.

Review by:
Martin Grotjahn

It is easier—and probably cheaper—to smash an atom than a prejudice. This startling fact can be understood only by a psychologist who specializes in the study of psychoanalysis, psychodynamics, or—at least—the unconscious. Gordon W. Allport, Professor of Psychology at Harvard, editor of the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, and member of the United States National Commission for UNESCO, strongly favors the 'multiple causation' approach. This avoidance of any 'one sided' approach prevents his penetrating his enormous subject to the required depth. History has shown that philosophical considerations have not helped to understand the unconscious. It is, however, theoretically possible that the discovery of the unconscious by psychologists and sociologists will some day advance new scientific achievements on 'multiple' levels. By covering an enormous field, Allport may have supplied the principle of organization for the study of prejudice. His opinions and studies are comprehensive and definitive.

Allport assumes that men everywhere reject in principle and by preference the path of war and destruction; they like to live in peace and friendship with their neighbors. They prefer to love and to be loved rather than to hate and to be hated. So there seems to be hope left in a World of Progress.

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