Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To access “The Standard Edition” of Freud’s work…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can directly access Strachey’s The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud through the Books tab on the left side of the PEP-Web screen.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: An Addendum to Freud's Theory of Anxiety. Charles Brenner. Pp. 18-24.. Psychoanal Q., 23:608.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: An Addendum to Freud's Theory of Anxiety. Charles Brenner. Pp. 18-24.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:608

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: An Addendum to Freud's Theory of Anxiety. Charles Brenner. Pp. 18-24.

In Inhibition, Symptom and Anxiety, Freud proposed the hypothesis that there are two kinds of anxiety: 1, that which arises automatically, without the participation of the ego, as the result of excessive quantity and intensity of psychic stimulation with a resulting state of psychic helplessness; and 2, that which arises as a signal of an approaching danger perceived by the ego. The first type Freud considered to be characteristic of infancy and of the actual neuroses; the second type he considered to be characteristic of later stages of psychic life and of the psychoneuroses. The present paper is concerned with the hypothesis concerning the mode of origin of the first type only. The evidence for this hypothesis is reviewed. The author suggests the following alternative hypotheses. 1. Anxiety is an emotion (affect) which the anticipation of danger evokes in the ego. 2. Anxiety as such is not present from birth or early infancy. In such very early periods the infant is aware only of pleasure or unpleasure as far as emotions are concerned. 3. As experience increases and other ego functions, such as memory and sensory perception, develop, the child becomes able to predict or anticipate that a state of unpleasure (traumatic situation) will develop. This dawning ability of the child to react to danger in advance is the beginning of the specific emotion of anxiety, which in the course of further development we may suppose to become increasingly sharply differentiated from other unpleasant emotions. This alternative hypothesis has the advantage of leaving open the possibility that the emotion experienced by the infant in a traumatic situation is also related genetically to other unpleasant emotions of later life.

AUTHOR'S ABSTRACT

- 608 -

Article Citation

(1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953. Psychoanal. Q., 23:608

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.