Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Greenson, R.R. (1954). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVII, 1953: Dynamics of the Countertransference Therese Benedek. Pp. 201-208.. Psychoanal Q., 23:617.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVII, 1953: Dynamics of the Countertransference Therese Benedek. Pp. 201-208.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:617

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVII, 1953: Dynamics of the Countertransference Therese Benedek. Pp. 201-208.

Ralph R. Greenson

Therese Benedek believes that sitting behind the patient serves the analyst as a defense by permitting him to keep his personality out of the analytic situation and by helping him to keep objective his reactions to his patients. She discusses the analyst's response to being 'recognized' by his patients. Apparently some analysts are blind to this recognition and interpret all their patients' reactions to them as transference reactions. Many analysts are unaware that they stir up transference attitudes in their patients by their own countertransference. It is important that the analyst be able to recognize his own countertransference reactions so that he will neither be inhibited in his imagination nor fail to recognize the role he himself plays in causing his patient's reactions to him.

- 617 -

Article Citation

Greenson, R.R. (1954). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVII, 1953. Psychoanal. Q., 23:617

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.