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After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Source. This will rearrange the results of your search, displaying articles according to their appearance in journals and books. This feature is useful for tracing psychoanalytic concepts in a specific psychoanalytic tradition.

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Woolf, P.J. (1959). Ego Psychology and Dynamic Casework. Papers from the Smith College School for Social Work: Edited by Howard J. Parad. New York: Family Service Association of America, 1958. 282 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 28:104-105.

(1959). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 28:104-105

Ego Psychology and Dynamic Casework. Papers from the Smith College School for Social Work: Edited by Howard J. Parad. New York: Family Service Association of America, 1958. 282 pp.

Review by:
Paul J. Woolf

Edited by the Director of Smith College School of Social Work, this book contains nineteen papers by seventeen social workers and psychiatrists, many of them very prominent in the field of social work. Psychotherapists in all fields will find much of interest and help.

Gordon Hamilton, in a masterly opening paper, sketches the spread of Freud's vitalizing ideas through the area of casework theory. With economy and clarity she tells of and evaluates the contributions, since 1917, of most of the leaders in social work and those psychiatrists who contributed to the change, including the neo-freudians.

Where Miss Hamilton paints Mary Richmond (one of early social work's most revered names) as frustrated and disturbed by Freud's 'immoral' concepts, Annette Garrett shows how many of Miss Richmond's ideas of casework remain basically sound although their methods of implementation have been revolutionized under the impact of ego psychology. In Worker-Client Relations, Miss Garrett presents a superb discussion of transference that could well be read by all who practice or teach psychotherapy.

Other contributors deal with subjects such as unconscious feelings, conscious and unconscious demands and needs—how to recognize and what to do about them; supportive therapy, and that which develops awareness; should or does the caseworker do psychotherapy, work with the unconscious?

Part II contains nine papers showing the application of dynamic casework with different types of client: 'borderline', 'anxiety hysterias', problems facing a school social worker.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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