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Kanzer, M. (1959). The Ineffective Soldier. Lessons for Management and the Nation. Volume I, the Lost Divisions, 225 Pp.; Volume II, Breakdown and Recovery, 284 Pp.; Volume III, Patterns of Performance, 340 Pp. By Eli Ginzberg, et al. New York: Columbia University Press, 1959.. Psychoanal Q., 28:408-410.

(1959). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 28:408-410

The Ineffective Soldier. Lessons for Management and the Nation. Volume I, the Lost Divisions, 225 Pp.; Volume II, Breakdown and Recovery, 284 Pp.; Volume III, Patterns of Performance, 340 Pp. By Eli Ginzberg, et al. New York: Columbia University Press, 1959.

Review by:
Mark Kanzer

The Ineffective Soldier is a three-volume study of 'manpower material'—its uses, management, and waste—on the basis of extensive statistical analyses of emotionally and mentally disturbed soldiers and veterans of World War II. Conducted by Eli Ginzberg and associates, it is a Conservation of Human Resources Project initiated at Columbia University by General Eisenhower in 1950. Emphasis is placed not only on 'lessons for the nation' but also on 'lessons for management', and the project is financed by an impressive array of leading industrial organizations.

The result might well be called the personnel manager's view of the emotionally and mentally disturbed soldier. The clinical aspects are meagerly outlined; the stress is on effective and ineffective performance.

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