Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To search for a specific phrase…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Did you write an article’s title and the article did not appear in the search results? Or do you want to find a specific phrase within the article? Go to the Search section and write the title or phrase surrounded by quotations marks in the “Search for Words or Phrases in Context” area.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Harley, M. (1959). Discussions on Child Development. Volume III. a Consideration of the Biological, Psychological, and Cultural Approaches to the Understanding of Human Development and Behavior: Edited by J. M. Tanner and Bärbel Inhelder. (The Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the World Health Organization Study Group on the Psychobiological Development of the Child, Geneva 1955.) New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1958. 223 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 28:410-412.

(1959). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 28:410-412

Discussions on Child Development. Volume III. a Consideration of the Biological, Psychological, and Cultural Approaches to the Understanding of Human Development and Behavior: Edited by J. M. Tanner and Bärbel Inhelder. (The Proceedings of the Third Meeting of the World Health Organization Study Group on the Psychobiological Development of the Child, Geneva 1955.) New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1958. 223 pp.

Review by:
Marjorie Harley

In this third meeting, the World Health Organization Study Group deals with two topics: the development of sex differences and the development of ego identity. The publication of the proceedings consists, as have the previous volumes, solely of verbatim transcripts of the meeting.

In the opening presentation, Margaret Mead examines anthropological data which might shed light on the occurrence of universal differences between the development and behavior of the sexes, 'however differently these may be patterned and institutionalized in different societies'. In general, she chooses a number of 'extreme' cases which on the surface would seem to illustrate the culturally determined aspects of such differences. Although she concedes parenthetically her belief that some universal (i.e., innately determined) differences do occur—for example, that the greater proportion of the 'strongest work' is done by men and that men's work is more highly valued—here, too, she points up striking variations.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.