Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up. But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on? The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser). So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Weiss, J. (1959). British Journal of Medical Psychology. XXXI, 1958: Objective Observations of Personality Development in Early Infancy. H. R. Schaffer. Pp. 174-183.. Psychoanal Q., 28:434-435.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: British Journal of Medical Psychology. XXXI, 1958: Objective Observations of Personality Development in Early Infancy. H. R. Schaffer. Pp. 174-183.

(1959). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 28:434-435

British Journal of Medical Psychology. XXXI, 1958: Objective Observations of Personality Development in Early Infancy. H. R. Schaffer. Pp. 174-183.

Joseph Weiss

Observations of seventy-six infants showed two distinct patterns of reaction to hospitalization in infancy. The first, called the 'global syndrome', usually observed in the infant under seven months of age, is characterized by the infant's extreme preoccupation with its environment upon return home. Typically, it scans its surroundings with a blank or anxious look. It does not seem to recognize familiar objects, and ignores or avoids the advances of members of its family. Disturbances of feeding and sleep are often noted. In the infant over seven months of age, the 'overdependent syndrome' is commonly found. This infant reacts to separation from its mother with fretting. After returning home from the hospital, it clings to its mother, fears strangers, and may avoid other members of the family. Before the middle of the first year of life, the infant is in what Piaget calls a state of 'adualism'; that is, there is no distinction between self and environment, and objects have no existence independent of the

- 434 -

infant's present perceptual field. Appearance of the global syndrome depends upon this nondifferentiation of self and perceptual field. Normally, the infant experiences sufficient environmental variations to keep its perceptual field in a relatively 'fluid' state. The hospitalized infant, however, experiences a monotony of environment which causes its perceptual field to become 'set'. On its return home, the 'set' perceptual field disintegrates. This stress may cause somatic disturbance. The overdependent syndrome can occur only after the infant becomes capable of distinguishing self from objects, and of recognizing permanence of objects; only when it can experience the existence of a mother figure can it respond to separation from her. There is no evidence of a gradually strengthening child-mother relationship: once recognition of separate objects has developed, the attachment to a specific mother figure appears at once and in its full intensity.

- 435 -

Article Citation

Weiss, J. (1959). British Journal of Medical Psychology. XXXI, 1958. Psychoanal. Q., 28:434-435

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.