Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return from a journal’s Table of Contents to the Table of Volumes…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can return with one click from a journal’s Table of Contents (TOC) to the Table of Volumes simply by clicking on “Volume n” at the top of the TOC (where n is the volume number).

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1959). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. III, 1955: A Contribution to the Problem of Termination of Training Analysis. Therese Benedek. Pp. 615-629.. Psychoanal Q., 28:563.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. III, 1955: A Contribution to the Problem of Termination of Training Analysis. Therese Benedek. Pp. 615-629.

(1959). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 28:563

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. III, 1955: A Contribution to the Problem of Termination of Training Analysis. Therese Benedek. Pp. 615-629.

In contrast to the frequent statement that a candidate's problems in his supervised analytic work (or an analyst's problems with his patients) are due to insufficient personal analysis, Benedek believes that at times the countertransference of the training analyst may cause an irresolvable transference neurosis in the training analysand. The goal of the training analysis is unique. The analyst must learn to meet stressful psychic situations at his job; he must learn to use his unconscious in a dependable manner in his work; his personality must be prepared for the process of interminable analysis, the fate as well as the equipment of the psychoanalyst.

The candidate's degree of neurosis and his ability to use his personality as a psychoanalytic tool have little correlation. The amount of analysis necessary in each area of the personality varies considerably. Formal training may interfere or confuse the therapeutic effect of the analysis. Personal analysis hinders the learning of self-analysis in supervised work. Benedek suggests dividing the analysis into two phases. The preparatory phase acquaints the candidate with the unconscious and enables the instructor to determine if he should continue his training (by Freud's criteria); it is continued till the candidate is emotionally ready to conduct psychoanalysis under supervision. He then stops, pursues his training, and integrates a postanalytic personality. The second phase of analysis tests the adequacy of self-analysis and gives opportunity to work through conflicts unresolved or activated by supervised work. It may be short or long depending on how much therapeutic work remains to be done.

- 563 -

Article Citation

(1959). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. III, 1955. Psychoanal. Q., 28:563

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.