Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To sort articles by author…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

While performing a search, you can sort the articles by Author in the Search section. This will rearrange the results of your search alphabetically according to the author’s surname. This feature is useful to quickly locate the work of a specific author.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1960). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XL, 1959: Oedipal Love in the Countertransference. Harold F. Searles. Pp. 180-190.. Psychoanal Q., 29:583.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XL, 1959: Oedipal Love in the Countertransference. Harold F. Searles. Pp. 180-190.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:583

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XL, 1959: Oedipal Love in the Countertransference. Harold F. Searles. Pp. 180-190.

In the course of a successful psychoanalysis, the analyst goes through a phase of reacting to and eventually relinquishing the patient as his Oedipal love object. The analyst develops romantic and erotic feelings toward his patient and may have fantasies of marrying him. The analyst should permit himself to experience such feelings fully, and should not attempt to repress them because of guilt or shame. Their development augurs well for the success of the analysis. Searles does not approve of the analyst's expressing such feelings to the patient, but he feels the patient may be permitted to become aware of them, and know that they are unrealizable. The patient's awareness of the analyst's erotic and romantic attachment, as well as the unrealizability of these feelings, aids his acceptance of himself as a mature sexual individual, and also his ultimate renunciation of the analyst as a sexual object. It may be more important for the schizophrenic than for the neurotic to become aware that his sexual feelings toward the analyst are, in a sense, reciprocated.

Searles believes also that the Oedipal phase leads to ego impairment and the evolution of a rigid superego, to the extent that a child's parents are unable to accept their own neurotic feelings toward him. The relationship of the mature parent to his child contains erotic elements that are deeply felt but only minimally acted out. This relationship aids the child in the resolution of his Oedipal feelings toward the parent.

- 583 -

Article Citation

(1960). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XL, 1959. Psychoanal. Q., 29:583

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.