Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1962). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XLI, 1960: The Psychology of Bitterness. James Alexander. Pp. 514-520.. Psychoanal Q., 31:123-123.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XLI, 1960: The Psychology of Bitterness. James Alexander. Pp. 514-520.

(1962). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 31:123-123

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XLI, 1960: The Psychology of Bitterness. James Alexander. Pp. 514-520.

The author feels that the study of affects has trailed behind the study of drives and the ego. He sees affects as composite structures which are qualitative entities containing ideational and drive elements, existing in both the conscious and the unconscious. He specifically attempts to deal with the affect of bitterness, both in its metapsychological and applied aspects. The bitter person feels resentful about pain which appears to be deliberately inflicted and unnecessary. The genesis of bitterness lies in the nursing phase and the first bitter taste comes from regurgitated bile. It may acquire pathological significance as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of traumatic fixations. Bitterness is a protest against object loss and a goad toward re-instatement of the lost object.

- 123 -

Article Citation

(1962). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XLI, 1960. Psychoanal. Q., 31:123-123

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.